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Reducing Amputations in the Community: The impact of a collaborative continuum of care model between a Healogics® Wound Care Center® and vascular surgery practice

Reducing Amputations in the Community Cover-Final
 

Chronic leg wounds, which are common complications of diabetes and peripheral arterial disease, are risk factors for amputation. A multidisciplinary approach to patient care has been recommended to increase patient satisfaction, enhance healing, and save limbs. With this approach in mind, a study was undertaken to assess the impact of a collaboration between a wound care center (Healogics Wound Care Center) and a vascular surgery practice (Stanford Health Care’s Vascular & Endovascular Surgery) on quality of care and clinical outcomes.

This large study included patients who underwent lower extremity interventions before and after the opening of the wound care center. Results showed that patient outcomes were significantly improved, including a much lower rate of amputation, by the coordination of care between the wound care and vascular practices.

Wound care professionals will find that this study, sponsored by Healogics Wound Care Center, validates current wound care best practices and makes the case for interdisciplinary collaboration with vascular surgery practices to reduce amputations in at-risk patients.

This white paper discusses the following:

Epidemiology of lower extremity amputation
Conditions predisposing to chronic leg wounds
Patient overlap in wound care centers and vascular surgery practices
Collaboration between a wound care center and a vascular surgery practice
Results of the collaboration in terms of amputation rates
Positive effects of a multidisciplinary collaborative continuum of care

This paper is written for health care providers with an interest in advanced wound care solutions.

Sponsored by Healogics, Inc.

Chronic leg wounds, which are common complications of diabetes and peripheral arterial disease, are risk factors for amputation. A multidisciplinary approach to patient care has been recommended to increase patient satisfaction, enhance healing, and save limbs. With this approach in mind, a study was undertaken to assess the impact of a collaboration between a wound care center (Healogics Wound Care Center) and a vascular surgery practice (Stanford Health Care’s Vascular & Endovascular Surgery) on quality of care and clinical outcomes.

This large study included patients who underwent lower extremity interventions before and after the opening of the wound care center. Results showed that patient outcomes were significantly improved, including a much lower rate of amputation, by the coordination of care between the wound care and vascular practices.

Wound care professionals will find that this study, sponsored by Healogics Wound Care Center, validates current wound care best practices and makes the case for interdisciplinary collaboration with vascular surgery practices to reduce amputations in at-risk patients.

This white paper discusses the following:

Epidemiology of lower extremity amputation
Conditions predisposing to chronic leg wounds
Patient overlap in wound care centers and vascular surgery practices
Collaboration between a wound care center and a vascular surgery practice
Results of the collaboration in terms of amputation rates
Positive effects of a multidisciplinary collaborative continuum of care

This paper is written for health care providers with an interest in advanced wound care solutions.

Sponsored by Healogics, Inc.

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