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Impact of Hyperbaric Oxygen on More Advanced Wagner Grades 3 and 4 Diabetic Foot Ulcers: Matching Therapy to Specific Wound Conditions

Impact of HBO on More Advanced Wagner Grades 3 and 4 Diabetic Foot Ulcers cover
 

The overall benefits of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) are extensively debated in healthcare literature. Many early studies that showed positive outcomes were conducted in hospitals, where compliance with treatment was ensured, unlike in real-life outpatient settings. Another complication is that the objectives of these earlier studies differed, thus making it difficult for clinicians to compare HBOT outcomes and apply the findings to individual patients regarding who would be good candidates for HBOT.

The goal of the current study is to help clinicians understand the effect of HBOT on patients with Wagner grade 3 or 4 diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). Using deidentified data on 25,562 DFUs from 2014 to 2018, the investigators compared healing and amputation rates in patients with or without HBOT and found that HBOT can be effective, particularly when treatment adherence is taken into consideration.

This paper describes the literature on HBOT use in diabetic foot ulcers and provides an in-depth look at the importance of reporting results on several levels in terms of treatment adherence and outcomes. Wound care professionals who are considering HBOT for their patients with diabetic foot ulcers will appreciate the authors’ meticulous research and findings.

This study discusses the following:

Identification of patients who may benefit from HBOT
Reported healing and amputation rates of patients with diabetic foot ulcers with and without HBOT
Effect of treatment compliance on outcomes
Importance of reporting outcomes at the population level, specific wound etiology level, and risk-stratified level

This paper is written for wound care clinicians and purchasing directors with an interest in product solutions.

Sponsored by Healogics

The overall benefits of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) are extensively debated in healthcare literature. Many early studies that showed positive outcomes were conducted in hospitals, where compliance with treatment was ensured, unlike in real-life outpatient settings. Another complication is that the objectives of these earlier studies differed, thus making it difficult for clinicians to compare HBOT outcomes and apply the findings to individual patients regarding who would be good candidates for HBOT.

The goal of the current study is to help clinicians understand the effect of HBOT on patients with Wagner grade 3 or 4 diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). Using deidentified data on 25,562 DFUs from 2014 to 2018, the investigators compared healing and amputation rates in patients with or without HBOT and found that HBOT can be effective, particularly when treatment adherence is taken into consideration.

This paper describes the literature on HBOT use in diabetic foot ulcers and provides an in-depth look at the importance of reporting results on several levels in terms of treatment adherence and outcomes. Wound care professionals who are considering HBOT for their patients with diabetic foot ulcers will appreciate the authors’ meticulous research and findings.

This study discusses the following:

Identification of patients who may benefit from HBOT
Reported healing and amputation rates of patients with diabetic foot ulcers with and without HBOT
Effect of treatment compliance on outcomes
Importance of reporting outcomes at the population level, specific wound etiology level, and risk-stratified level

This paper is written for wound care clinicians and purchasing directors with an interest in product solutions.

Sponsored by Healogics

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